Shrimp Dumpling

Yesterday, I went to a new Chinese restaurant in my neighborhood and ordered steamed shrimp dumplings served in a bamboo basket. I asked the waiter,”This is dim sum, right?” and she told me it was ‘hakau’. Maybe it’s the Indonesian-style Chinese name?

I googled and found that ‘hakau’ was ‘har gow’ in Cantonese, or 虾饺 [xiā jiǎo] in simplified Mandarin and it was a type of dim sum dish. 虾 [xiā]  is ‘shrimp’, 饺 [jiǎo]  is ‘dumpling’.

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I searched 虾饺 ‘har gow’ on Google Image. Yummy!

By coincidence, today I learned the word 点心 [diǎnxin] or ‘dim sum’ from my Chinese word book. It also means ‘snack’/’sweets’.

From these 2 sentences:

我喜欢吃蔬菜。Wǒ xǐhuan chī shūcài. I like eating vegetable.
孩子们都喜欢吃点心。Háizimen dōu xǐhuan chī diǎnxīn. All children like eating snacks.

I found a pattern:
Subject+喜欢吃+food。 = like eating…

I liked the ‘har gow‘, so… 我喜欢吃虾饺 [Wǒ xǐhuan chī xiājiǎo] = I like eating ‘har gow‘.

These 3 sentences share the same pattern:

他买了一个苹果。Tā mǎile yíge píngguǒ. He bought an apple.
我吃了三个面包。Wǒ chīle sān gè miànbāo. I ate 3 pieces of bread.
我吃了一碗面条。Wǒ chīle yìwǎn miàntiáo. I ate a bowl of noodle.

Just add 了 [le] to verb to make past tense. Easy.

So… ‘I ate har gow‘ is 我吃了(insert a bowl or a tray here?)虾饺。?
I don’t know how to count ‘har gow‘. It’s a task for another day, I guess.

And this sentence seems to be another way to say ‘delicious’:

这个菜味道很好。Zhège cài wèidao hěn hǎo. This dish tastes very good.

Wait. How the tone of 一 [yī] becomes [yí] or [yì] again? Let’s google…

Tone Rule #3: 一 https://chinesepod.com/tools/pronunciation/section/17

When 一 [yī]  meets the 4th tone -and also neutral tone, right?-, the tone rises (2nd). For other tones, it falls (4th).

Except for dates, it stays the same as 一 [yī], right?

今天五月一号。 Jīntiān wǔyuè yīhào. Today is May 1.

ChinesePod seems like something like Talk To Me In Korean for Mandarin? Except that it’s not free. The video lessons on their YouTube channel are free to watch so…

That’s all. 再见!###

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